Stone Genealogy

John Stone (1750-1827)    William Stone (1772-1856)

_DNA_Info

pedigree view
Show age in year Entering a year here will show a person's age in parentheses beside their birth date.
Enter or change the year in the box, then hit enter.
If a person is not yet born in that year, then a negative number will be shown,
indicating the number of years before they were born.
Ages may be removed by blanking the year.
Born: Compliation page for DNA Info Father:
Died: Mother:
Children: Siblings:
Married:
Family Tree DNA Links 06Oct2017 Most all of the familytreedna links below are broken. I'm in the process of fixing them. So this page will look worse than usual as I add gud links here at the top in prep of fixing the bad links below. Tks for bearing with me. Fritz.

Our Stone Family (R1b1a2 Hap’group-A)
Genealogy Info from people submitting their DNA
This page shows links to DNA Results. Clicking the Colorized Chart link shows DNA results for all families in the Stone project. To see our Stone family (Wm 1772) search (Ctrl F) "R1b1a2 Hap'group - A".




I (Fritz) do not have a surname of Stone, hence, my DNA is no good for this project. I am related to Sandy & her male relation who was so kind to submit his DNA. Our genealogy is solid back to William b.1772. We have several reasonably solid links to his father being John b.1750. (DAR submissions & footnote in the book "Stone Connections" by Robert H Stone.)

Below are the 5 DNA submissions having the 67-marker test done that match exactly. According to the info found on the 'Matching Marker Table' link above, these 5 families have a 95% probability that the most recent common ancestor was not more than 6 generations ago. I interpret that to mean that these 5 DNA submissions have a common ancestor 6 generations back. For Sandy, that would be our questionable John b.1750. For Sue & #158318 that would be William b.1751/1752. So, that appears to leave Sandy & me out in the cold. But wait, it is a 95% chance - don't you love statistics? It's worth noting that William b.1751 has a brother, John b.circa 1750. Reseach is currently being done in this area.

Group #7-J Test results received. Kit #158526 (Sandy) Haplogroup: R1b1b2 (suggested) (genealogy data needed for Family Tree web site but is contained on this web site)
Group #7-L Test results received. Kit #175368 (Sue) Haplogroup: R1b1b2 (suggested)
Group #7-I Test results received. Kit #158318 Haplogroup: R1b1b2 (suggested)
Group #7-K Test results received. Kit #173898 Haplogroup: R1b1b2 (suggested) (genealogy data needed)
Group #7-M Test results received. Kit #182914 Haplogroup: R1b1b2 (suggested) (genealogy data needed)




Misc DNA stuff assisting in understand what "6 generators back" means.
http://www.familytreedna.com/faq/answers.aspx?id=21#796
on this page, FAQ #57 Generation faq id: 699 A generation is the number of years between the birth of the parents and the birth of their children. Different studies use different numbers of years per generation. At Family Tree DNA we use 25 years. However, for Time to Most Common Ancestor (TMCA) calculations, it is the number of generations that is important.
on this page, FAQ #95 Most Recent Common Ancestor (MRCA) faq id: 740 The ancestor shared most recently between two individuals.
on this page, FAQ #138 Time to the Most Recent Common Ancestor (TMRCA) faq id: 788 The amount of time or number of generations since individuals have shared a common ancestor. Since mutations occur at random, the estimate of the TMRCA is not an exact number (i.e., 7 generations), but rather a probability distribution. As more information is compared, the TMRCA estimate becomes more refined.
on this page, FAQ #147 Most Distant Known Ancestor (MDKA) faq id: 1677 Your most distant known ancestor (MDKA) is the furthest person who you have documented on a specific genealogical line. In genetic genealogy, it usually refers to someone on a direct maternal line (the mother, her mother, her mother's mother, etc.) or to a direct paternal line (the father, his father, his father's father, etc.).
http://www.familytreedna.com/faq/search.aspx?k=generation&c=&o=0&ps=25
on this page
Generation faq id: 699 A generation is the number of years between the birth of the parents and the birth of their children. Different studies use different numbers of years per generation. At Family Tree DNA we use 25 years. However, for Time to Most Common Ancestor (TMCA) calculations, it is the number of generations that is important.
The important definition of generations:
http://www.familytreedna.com/faq/answers.aspx?id=51#2127
on this page, FAQ #4 Who is 1 generation ago? faq id: 2127 FTDNATiP™ calculations start counting generations with the parent generation. Therefore, the father of the person tested is generation 1, the paternal grandfather generation 2, etc.






Copyright © 2015